The Scholastic Art & Writing Awards

Available: USA Nationwide
Closing Date: 1/6/2014
Since 1923, teens like Truman Capote, Richard Avedon, and Myla Goldberg earned their first accolades from the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards. Who’s next?

Join us to celebrate 90 years of creativity!

How to Enter

How do I enter a work in the 2014 Scholastic Art & Writing Awards?

Get the Info!

Find and review your regional program guidelines HERE. You’ll need to know your school zip code.

Then register an account at www.artandwriting.org/ors/registration. This will be your creativity command center!

Be a Maker and a Breaker!

Create your work! Click HERE to see examples of the 2013 National Scholastic Award-winning submissions.

Once you’ve made that masterpiece, return to your Scholastic Awards account and upload it.

Stamp it and Send It!

When you’ve uploaded your work, you’ll be prompted to print your submission forms. Have them signed by a parent/guardian and an educator from your school, and then mail them off to your Regional Program. Make sure to read and follow the mailing instructions for your regional program carefully.

Regional Notifications will be sent to award-winning students by January 31, 2014. National Notifications will be sent via email on March 17, 2014.

What else do I need to know?

Eligibility

Any public, private, parochial or home-school student in grades 7 – 12 in the U.S., Canada or an American school abroad may participate in the Awards.

Category Descriptions

For a full list of category descriptions, including size requirements and other instructions for how to prepare and submit your work, please click HERE.

Judging Criteria

There are three things that haven’t changed about the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards and its judging process since 1923:

  • Blind Judging: Our jurors do not know the identities of students who submit work to the Awards.
  • Freedom of Expression: No work will be disqualified on the basis of its content.
  • The Criteria: Originality, technical skill, and the emergence of a personal vision or voice.

What is Originality?

The nature of creative reinvention makes originality hard to define. Works of high originality challenge conventions, blur the boundaries between genres, and shift jurors’ notions of how a particular concept or emotion can be expressed. We encourage our jurors to look for works of art and writing that surprise them. Many of the works submitted to the Awards begin as classroom assignments. A functional definition of originality is work that goes beyond the classroom assignment and demands its own reason to exist in the world.

What is Technical Skill?

Each year, we bring thousands of professional artists, writers, educators, and scholars together, with functional expertise in specific genres, to evaluate the skills demonstrated by students who submit works to the Awards. Technical skill is judged on how it is used to advance an original perspective or a personal vision or voice. Rather than being evaluated for specific skill proficiencies, students will be evaluated on how they used their skills to create something unique, powerful, and innovative.

What is Personal Vision or Voice?

We all know what the personal visions and voices of Awards alumni Andy Warhol, Truman Capote, Richard Avedon, and Sylvia Plath looked and sounded like when they became professional artists and writers. But what did their works look and sound like when they were teenagers? This is precisely the question we ask our jurors to consider during the judging process. It’s no coincidence that the Awards have identified some of the most important creative minds of the past nine decades. We are in the business of identifying the self-possessed, unique voices and visions of teenage artists and writers.

Guidelines and Deadlines

Use the zip code look up tool on the right to find guidelines and deadlines for the Regional Program in your area. Remember to enter your school zip code; home school students should enter their home zip code.

Eligibility

Any public, private, parochial or home-school student in grades 7 – 12 in the U.S., Canada or an American school abroad may participate in the Awards.

Category Descriptions

For a full list of category descriptions, including size requirements and other instructions for how to prepare and submit your work, please click HERE.

Judging Criteria

There are three things that haven’t changed about the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards and its judging process since 1923:

  • Blind Judging: Our jurors do not know the identities of students who submit work to the Awards.
  • Freedom of Expression: No work will be disqualified on the basis of its content.
  • The Criteria: Originality, technical skill, and the emergence of a personal vision or voice.

http://www.artandwriting.org/the-awards/how-to-enter/

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s